Tips for Returning to Nursing After a Career Break

People take career breaks for a number of reasons. Sometimes, they have young children to take care of at home or an elderly family member to look after. Sometimes, people just take a break to recuperate and find a balance in their lives. Although necessary, career breaks don’t have to be permanent and you can return to work when you think you are ready. If you are thinking of returning to nursing after a career break, you will feel a little lost. However, with the right guidance, you will find it easier to get back to working as a nurse. 

1. Update Your CV: 

One of the most important things to do when you are returning after a career break is to update your CV. If you have acquired any new skills during your career break, you should add them to your CV. You can also mention if you received a certification while you were away from nursing. 

Hiring managers would also expect you to include an explanation of the gap in your CV. Although you can only go into detail in your cover letter, it is better to include a brief explanation of your break in your CV before you start hunting for jobs again. 

Keep in mind that any activity you engaged in that taught you something will look good on your CV. Despite taking a break from work, many nurses continue to volunteer at local hospitals and schools. If you also participated in volunteering activities, make sure to add that to your CV. 

2. Nursing after a Career Break On Your Schedule: 

If your nursing career before the break was exhausting, don’t make the same mistakes the second time around. Make sure that you are calling the shots this time. Before you reach out to a healthcare recruitment agency or hospital admin for a job, figure out what you want to do. 

As a nurse, you can work in a number of roles around a medical facility. You can also decide whether you want to work the weekends and the night shift. Review your current daily routine and you will be able to figure out how many hours you can dedicate to nursing each day. 

Another important thing to decide is what kind of setting you want to work in. You can choose to work at a hospital, community health center, or general practice surgery. 

3. Networking with the Right People: 

Nurses often have to work with teams, which is why they understand the value of helping each other more than anybody. So, if you are thinking of returning to nursing, you should also take steps to return to your people. You can reach out to old colleagues and mentors to ask for advice about the current landscape of nursing. 

The Changed World of Nursing after a Career Break

Industries can change drastically within a month so imagine the kind of change they go through in years. If you are returning to nursing after a few years, things will definitely not be the same, and that’s why you need other people. Learning about the current trends in nursing can help you figure out how to get ready to join the field again. You can also learn about new opportunities by reaching out to other nurses and healthcare staff

4. Consider Volunteering: 

Sometimes, you need to see the workings of a changed world up close before you decide to completely commit to it. So, before you re-register with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), you should consider volunteering at a local hospital. 

While volunteering, you will be able to get re-acquainted with the routines and the procedures that are an everyday thing for nurses. You will also interact with patients regularly and get a glimpse of what it would mean to start working as a nurse again. Once you think you are ready to work as a nurse again, you can start your job search. 

5. Job Boards & Recruitment Agencies: 

Join local job boards so you can learn about new opportunities for returning nurses. You should also reach out to recruitment agencies and staffing platforms. Sign up with a nursing platform that helps nurses find jobs in the UK according to their requirements. 

Returning to nursing after a career back can be scary. However, the right people can help you get over your fear and offer valuable advice about your future. And once you are ready to start working as a nurse again, you can begin your job search.